Alla Carta #18
Alla Carta #18
Alla Carta #18
Alla Carta #18
Alla Carta #18
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Alla Carta #18

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Alla Carta is a bi-annual magazine that approaches high-end fashion, art and design in a uniquely Italian way. The interviews always take place around a table, to celebrate one of the oldest Italian traditions: conviviality.

In this issue:

Alla Carta 18 comes to life under the stars in “Piazza Grande”. The song written by Lucio Dalla in 1976 is an ode to everything that the piazza represents and all those who pass through it: merchants, brigands, lovers, and cats. We have made the square the back- drop to our stories and those merchants, brigands, lovers and cats – or pigeons – , the stars.

The piazza represents social equality. A symbolic space for public art, pieces free from pedestals and accessible to all. Artworks created to challenge and clash with the social and urban fabric of the city. The piazza is communication, rendezvous, conflict, seduction and sex. Each and every form in which it manifests expresses a relationship. Fountains grimacing at churches, merchants shouting, lovers embracing, strangers looking into each other's eyes, and a family eating at a bar table overlooking the piazza. As soon as you enter the piazza, you immediately find yourself in the middle of a conversation, whether shouted, whispered, physical or virtual. After all, what are they if not “piazzas” those spaces, albeit virtual, where every day we contend with contemporary sociality, business meetings, religious rites, family events, intimate and romantic encounters? The hashtag may have replaced the banners but the fight continues there too. As society struggles to survive and adapt to new and changeable realities, Piazza Grande remains a symbol of our essential need for sociality: “A modo mio avrei bisogno di carezze anch'io”. In my own way I too need caresses.