Skip to product information
1 of 1

BLAU #7

Regular price £22.00 GBP
Regular price Sale price £22.00 GBP
Sale Sold out
Tax included.

The late Peter Lindbergh once said, “BLAU is like your favorite restaurant, at which you want to order each and every single dish.” Having been printed in German since 2015, the now international magazine is the new reference point for art journalism, published twice a year. With that, I have come a little closer to my dream of making the most beautiful art magazine in the world. It’s a goal I’ve had since I was 13, when, in my uncle’s garage, I dug up and dusted off countless volumes of seemingly every German art magazine issued after the Second World War.

BLAU International’s distinctive content features scintillating stories and images from today’s and yesteryear’s art worlds: studio visits with the most influential artists of our time, exclusive contributions by acclaimed writers such as Peter Handke, Hanya Yanagihara, and Julian Barnes, portraits by star photographers such as Jamie Hawkesworth, and fashion spreads styled by the renowned Marie Chaix. It is a coffee-table magazine and collector’s item all in one.
 
We hope you are with us on our journey, traveling the world of art from old to new, obscure to famous, and back again. It’s all in the mix.

In this issue:

In No. 7, Rebecca Warren, in a rare interview, time travels between Degas’s dancers and sci-fi comix, and lands in a present that has finally caught up with her. We announce painting’s new Prince of Paris, Pol Taburet. And John Currin reveals the true depth, over 20 pages, of his controversial “Memorial” series: we have it all, almost live and in 3D.

Other highlights include Andy Robert talking with Thelma Golden; a fashion editorial by Marie Chaix and Oliver Hadlee Pearch; Jon Rafman speaking on the internet, mobs, and exile; the Peruvian painter Sara Flores wedding the visual and healing arts; Balkrishna Doshi on architecture as storytelling; the Utrecht Caravaggisti running riot in Rome; and the Parisian apartment of Chilean surrealist Matta captured by François Halard.