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Profane #13

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Profane is a French publication dedicated entirely to the amateur — people obsessed with things they aren’t paid to do. Its pages are filled with artists and collectors, creators and appreciators, who are all inspired by something greater than the need to make a living or seek personal fame.

 In this issue:

AN EDITORIAL

To you, this isn’t a special number. You don’t indulge in superstition, you haven’t fallen prey to triskaidekaphobia, even if, come to think of it, you do have a pet object, a hidden phobia, rituals, a certain idea of luck, chance, encounters. Well. In your hands, the new issue of Profane. You are about to browse it. It looks bigger, and admittedly, it contains more visions. Twelve more pages. Besides its slightly larger format, we didn’t consider it to be a special edition. And yet. It is clear that the thirteenth issue has decided, deep down, to turn the pages in its own way. A spiritualist je ne sais quoi. Topics that have driven collective energy, passed the word around to form sentences with double meanings, unknown alliances. Something is stirring.

Number 13 is not only driven by an amateur spirit, a way of approaching the world with curiosity, ingenuousness, instinct, and ingenuity, following a roadmap devoid of calculations, of mirrors, over time, a time we allow ourselves. Other spirits are there. Poltergeists, playful and mystical spirits! Stepping into costumes, shoes, appropriating emotions, places, and outlines that are less contrived, uninhibited.
Mediumship, psychic painting, psychomagic, pareidolic visions, alternative education, re-enactment of childhood through play, cutting, and dressing up, ancient rites, interaction with nature, a cabinet of curiosities: everything here is conducive to opening the doors of the unconscious and having fun with what the world retains, constrains, organizes, and holds. And to nurture this odd fire, a few more pages were clearly needed.

Carine Soyer